Monthly Archives: March 2015

Info path is back in SharePoint 2016 but OHHHH Nintex is sweet!

Posted by Jim on March 18, 2015
SharePoint 2013, SharePoint 2016 / Comments Off on Info path is back in SharePoint 2016 but OHHHH Nintex is sweet!

NintexInfo path is back in SharePoint 2016 but you really should look at the Nintex Forms tools. I was recently in a demo for a large client. I had heard a lot about the tools capabilities and am a user of the Nintex work flow tool … but was amazed with what Nintex is doing.

So what’s the BASK STORY ..? ……. on January 31st 2014, Microsoft posted a blog post titled “Update on InfoPath and SharePoint Forms” in which they announced that InfoPath 2013 will be the last version of InfoPath, and they are currently working on a new version of FoSL for both SharePoint Server & Office 365. They promised an update at the SharePoint Conference 2014 in Vegas, and they delivered. Microsoft presented Session number SPC348 at SPC that showed us a new way of editing FoSL directly online!

Everyone has been scrambling for replacement tools ………. And I think Nintex will find it’s place as a solid replacement tool for serious development shops!

http://en-us.nintex.com/workflow-platform/nintex-forms

 

New Visualizations Available only in Power BI Preview

Posted by Jim on March 04, 2015
SharePoint 2013, SharePoint 2016 / Comments Off on New Visualizations Available only in Power BI Preview

This looks like the tool fo choise going forward for the next GEN in SharePoint 2016 – Check out the cool integration.

 

In addition to being HTML 5 based, the new Power BI preview comes with a number of new visualizations to add to your dashboards including:

  • Combo Charts
  • Filled Maps
  • Guages
  • Tree Maps
  • Funnel Charts

4645_dashboard2

Power BI is no longer tied to Excel and Office 365

One of the key drivers for moving users to Office 365 was that Power BI as a feature set was only available within Office 365.  Similarly, you needed Excel 2013 as a key authoring tool to create Power View reports and deploy them to SharePoint online.

While Office 365 and Excel will still work well with the Power BI platform, they are no longer required.  Power BI is now independent of both platforms with its own “portal” on PowerBI.com and its own designer for building dashboards.  The designer is HTML 5 based which means you could design reports using a basic browser instead of requiring Excel as a desktop client.

Power BI Supports but no Longer depends on Your SQL Server

Power BI is essentially now a pure NoSQL based service.  If you look at the APIs, the data sets you can send into Power BI are JSON based and completely abstracted from traditional SQL databases.

While Power BI can pull data from SQL Servers, it also supports a variety of other platforms including non-Microsoft based SAAS services.  Expect the list of SAAS services to expand dramatically as preview becomes the full production version.